Personae in “The Crooked Mirror”

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As promised, here are some of the “characters” who people my memoir, The Crooked Mirror. First, here is my beloved Zen rabbi, Don Singer, at the Bearing Witness Retreat at Auschwitz-Birkenau sponsored by the Zen Peacemakers. Photo: Peter Cunningham.

Cheryl in Kolomay
Cheryl H., my companion and muse, a poet and gifted dreamer, in Ukraine in front of what we thought was the Grand Hotel– which had been in her family. We later did find the right building. Cheryl often asked difficult questions, like “Do They Miss Us?”

Poland Radomsko 2006 143
Tomasz (Tomek) Cebulski, my intrepid Polish guide over the years of writing the book. We’ve driven through pea-soup fog together, visited LeninWorld in Lithuania, attended seders in Warsaw and Lublin, and searched for (and found) my great-grandmother’s grave in Radomsko, Poland.

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Maciej Ziembinski, one of the “saviors of Atlantis,” an intrepid journalist in Radomsko, Poland. Maciej had the Radomsk Yizkor translated into Polish, and published it as a serial in his independent newspaper.

Radomsk yizkor book cover
The Radomsk Yizkor (Memorial Book of the Community of Radomsk), which plays a big role in The Crooked Mirror

Berek and family
Berek Ofman, a retired tailor and son of a dynasty of kosher butchers in Radomsko. Berek survived with his friend (and later his wife) Regina and her parents and one of her cousins in a bunker built into a house in Radomsko. This photo taken after the war, showing Berek and Regina and their two children Leo and Tova.

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Janka and Marian Bereska, Berek’s rescuers.

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Marian Bereska, standing next to Tomek and his grandson Szymon, showing the site of the house with the bunker in Radomsko, winter 2010.

5 Responses to “Personae in “The Crooked Mirror””

  1. How remarkable that you found Esther Tepper, a survivor from Rodomsk, and a relative by marriage to your aunt, living in Beverly Hills, not much more than five miles away from where you live. I could really hear her strong voice, which included her unshakable gratitude for the Polish woman who saved her life and her skepticism about Poles as a people ever changing their attitude towards Jews. Your final chapters seem like your deep response to her doubt, an inspired reply, but not a challenge.

  2. Wonderful to put faces to the names in your book. And my drawing of yours of the Ukrainian eggcup has taken on wonderful richness.LOVE

  3. MARK MENDLEY Says:

    Thanks for sending. I really enjoyed those faces at your talk. – Laura

  4. Fantastic and sweet poignant faces. Such a treat, Louise. Thank you.

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